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CYANOBACTERIA MONITORING COLLABORATIVE

THREE COORDINATED MONITORING PROJECTS TO LOCATE AND UNDERSTAND HARMFUL CYANOBACTERIA

We work with citizen scientists, trained water professionals, and the general public to find and study cyanobacteria in waterbodies.

GET INFORMED

Cyanobacteria (sometimes referred to as blue-green algae) are tiny organisms that can be found in diverse environments ranging from deserts to oceans.

Under the right conditions, cyanobacteria can form “blooms” on the surface. These blooms can be a problem because many cyanobacteria produce toxins dangerous to humans and wildlife. Cyanobacteria and their toxins can be found in water as well as in the air nearby.

Skin irritations, illness, loss of plant and animal life, loss of aesthetic appeal, loss of recreational opportunities, reduction in property values…

Help us better understand cyanobacteria by participating in one of our programs (bloomWatch, cyanoScope and cyanoMonitoring)

Start monitoring for cyanos

 If you want even more information, check through our suggested resources for more technical details on cyanobacteria

View technical resources

Read the latest CYANOS NEWS BELOW or check out all cyanos news stories

GET INVOLVED

Check out bloomWatch, cyanoScope, and cyanoMonitoring to find ways you can start monitoring cyanobacteria.

bloomWatch App

Crowdsourcing to find and report potential cyanobacteria blooms

Engaging the public to report when and where potential cyanobacteria blooms appear.

Learn more

cyanoScope

Mapping cyanobacteria one slide at a time

Engaging trained citizen scientists and professional water quality managers to understand where and when cyanobacteria species occur.

Learn more

cyanoMonitoring

Monitoring cyanobacteria populations over time

Engaging professionals and trained citizen scientists to track seasonal patterns of cyanobacteria.

Learn more

GET IN TOUCH

The strength of our program lies in the diversity and combined expertise of collaborators like you. Don’t be shy about getting in touch!

Send us a message

Join our listserv

Cyanos listserv

Like us on Facebook

cyanomon

Follow us on Twitter

@cyanomon

Program Lead

Hilary Snook
US EPA Region I

snook.hilary@epa.gov

Outreach & Web

Shane Bradt
UNH Cooperative Extension

shane.bradt@unh.edu
@limnoshane

Data & Analysis

Jeff Hollister
US EPA Office of Research and Development

Hollister.Jeff@epa.gov
@jhollist